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    Can Golf Training Aids Improve Your Golf Swing?

    If you’ve ever stood on the practice ground at a European Tour or PGA Tour event – you’ll know the answer is yes!

    At last year’s US Open, the second of golf’s major championships, eventual winner Martin Kaymer was seen practising using a tennis-ball contraption that was designed to keep his forearms the correct distance apart during his backswing.

    The evergreen Miguel Angel Jimenez is also frequently seen using a pole which doubles-up as both a warm-up object and an alignment stick.

    Of course, Kaymer and Jimenez have a significant advantage over the average amateur golfer in that they have their professional coach with them whenever they practise.

    However, there are many golf swing training aids out there that amateur golfers can use to improve their golf swing.

    Proliner

    This works on the principal that the address position is crucial to a good golf swing, and is a kit that is designed to help golfers perfect their set-up and alignment. It’s small and easy to take with you to the driving range, and is certainly worth a go if you think set-up and alignment are at the route of all your problems.

    However, if you’re still not hitting the ball where you want to after you’ve improved your set-up and alignment – it’s not going to tell you how to.

    Golf Metronome

    A piece of golf swing training equipment designed solely to improve the tempo of a golfer’s swing. It combines audio and visual aids designed to make you repeatedly swing the club at the same tempo – and is ideal if this is something you struggle to achieve.

    The negatives include having to wear earphones whilst swinging and, even if you master your tempo, it won’t tell you why you might still be hitting bad shots.

    The Swingyde Trainer

    This golf swing aid costs less money than an average golf lesson and is designed to help golfers make the perfect wrist hinge during the backswing, which in turn creates club-head speed and a better release of the club-head at impact. It is endorsed by Professionals on several tours as a useful warm-up aid.

    Having been around for a while now, however it’s maybe slightly one dimensional compared to the more revolutionary technological golf training aids – and offers no analysis of poor shots or how to correct them.

    Zepp Swing Analyser

    This golf swing analyzer is a solid idea, and is designed to be used with a smart phone, iPhone, tablet or other mobile device. You operate it by attaching a sensor to the back of your golf glove when you make a swing. Your mobile device can then be used to measure and analyzes the data of your swing using its wireless function. Data includes club-shaft angle and club-head speed. You can also view your swings in 3D from a selection of angles.

    The negatives are it’s expensive compared to many other golf training aids, and you’ll probably still need a golf lesson or two to help you analyze your data and correct your faults.

    Swing Boss

    The Swing Boss golf training aid has been designed to allow golfers to see what part of the club-face they’re hitting the ball off, and achieves this through a combination of ultra-lightweight practice balls and Velcro recorder-pads. However it also comes with extensive tips on how to correct your off-centre hits. This means you can work out your faults and gain an understanding of how to correct them – which is ideal knowledge to have when you’re out on the course. It’s also compact and lightweight, and is great for use in the garden or anywhere else you’ve might have room to swing a golf club.

    No real negatives – and hard to fault.

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